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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well my low-boy gas water heater started leaking badly in the crawl space and this style of heater has been banned therefore not produced anymore. Plumbers wanted to put in an electric heater and that is where I drew the line. :dead: :dead: :dead:


I have crawled around on my knees sweating in pipes and trying to follow both code and proper plumbing principals to install this Paloma tankless heater. I am sore and miserable but it is almost over.
Retail stores don't carry the 3/4 flex gas connector since nearly all residential installations have traditionally been 1/2". Tomorrow I will have to go to a plumbing supply place and get my gas line connector and I will be good to go.

I have never sweat a line in my life so I feel pretty good right now after designing and building this arrangement. Not a single drip when tested. :bigsmile: :bigsmile: :bigsmile:
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I installed surge tanks on both the hot and cold side. I heard them working when the water is turned on and off. Pretty cool :bigsmile:
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I really needed to be working on my boat but here is another rush/urgent project that got in the way :dead: :dead:


Anyone else using tankless???? How do you like it??
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
noise pollution said:
Looks nice. What's the purpose of the surge tanks?


Like c team said maintain even water pressure. Most states have now adapted a minimum requirement code of one surge tank on the hot side after the hot water heater to controll thermal expansion which causes damage to pipes and valves. Also when the water is turned on and off the sudden stop causes what is called "water hammer" in plumbers terms and that kind of shock loading the plumbing causes failures.

The kitchen faucet has failed twice since we have been here in 7 years because the pressure regulator failed and we were running at street pressure of 82psi :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: That set up some serious hammer which took out that valve.

With a surge tank on both sides the flow and pressure is perfectly constant and the on and off functions are very smooth.

The tank was only $50 and plumbers recommend them on both sides so I did it. Glad I did too. :bigsmile: :bigsmile: :bigsmile:


Any installation that uses a well pump MUST have a tank like this but larger to controll the water since the pump is pushing directly into the plumbing.
 

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You BLOT that schit!
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Looking real clean and professional!

I had "hammer" problems here too (a lot of copper or other rigid lines will cause it). In other words, the plastic flexible lines tend to absorb the shock of closing valves better I guess.

I ended up installing the little source ones (look like Co2 canisters). Worked for me, because not all the fixtures were causing the hammer.

I am REALLY interested in doing one of the tankless jobbers. Problem is, I don't have Propane or NG, heat is oil, so no need for it.

The electric model I would need according to the chart for our house pulls something like 127 amps! :eek:

Can you give us an idea what this whole set up cost and what you expect to save vs. a conventional tank model?
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
PJDiesel said:
Looking real clean and professional!

I had "hammer" problems here too (a lot of copper or other rigid lines will cause it). In other words, the plastic flexible lines tend to absorb the shock of closing valves better I guess.

I ended up installing the little source ones (look like Co2 canisters). Worked for me, because not all the fixtures were causing the hammer.

I am REALLY interested in doing one of the tankless jobbers. Problem is, I don't have Propane or NG, heat is oil, so no need for it.

The electric model I would need according to the chart for our house pulls something like 127 amps! :eek:

Can you give us an idea what this whole set up cost and what you expect to save vs. a conventional tank model?

I do have all copper in my house and the pressure regulator was not working at all so hammering was hard.


One problem I have is my house design. It is a Cape Cod style and the floor plan has no provission for a water heater. Because of this problem State built a "low boy" nat gas, 40 gal, unit that stood only 34" tall to fit in the crawl space. Since mine was built these water heater were pluaged with problems so they have been outlawed and are no longer produced.
What all that means is, I didn't have much choice when mine failed. It was either tankless gas or electric tank. That seemed like a no brainer to me.


Those electric tankless are pigs. You are right about HIGH amps!!!!!!!!! I would have to run three 40 amp breakers in my box to handle one of those. That was more expense than just installing the gas since I already had the service.

On the other hand the gas unit requires a 3/4 gas line and connector line. All residential appliances normally use 1/2 and only something large like an oven or dryer might use a 5/8". I had to modify my gas line under the house to accomodate this higher flow. So a gas unit at full blast of 199,000 btu will use a lot of natural gas too.

My savings will be $20 right off the top every month for starters and then a closer look will tell more.

I got this heater off ebay so I paid a little more than half of the cost of a new unit. Then there is the stainless vent kit that runs about $400. My unit came with that too :bigsmile: To hook up the water lines there is an install kit provided by the mfg (sold separately-$100) :unhappy1: I looked at the install book and saw what they had in mind and built it myself for about $30 in fittings and a blister on my finger from a solder burn. :clown: My total expense to build this system was about $1400. To buy all the parts new would have cost about $2300 for what I had to do. I updated my system at the same time and replace parts that were bad due to my plumbing problems.
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Go Fast Daddy said:
How would you handle hard water issues with one of these?
I didn't check into that question as hard water is not an issue at my location.
My dad on the other hand has hard water and he has a softner where his service comes into the house.


That would be a great question for the tankless people though.

What I have learned so far it seems that the Noritz and the Rinnai are the heavier built units with thicker and replaceable burners. Other models do not have replaceable burners. If it goes then you get another heater. :unhappy1:
 

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Stokers Rule
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well this was the last piece. It is up and running and I like the idea of setting my shower temp and just getting in without messing with mixing to get it right.
Perfectly consistant too. I like it already :bigsmile: :bigsmile: :bigsmile:
 

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